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Liberia: Second House Almost Livable

Liberia: Second House Almost Livable

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The back of house number two with the extended porch.

MONROVIA, Liberia—After two years and numerous delays, house two on the missionary compound in Liberia may soon be ready for Ulster missionary, Joanne Greer’s, move-in.

In January 2012, the FPCNA began raising funds to build two, four bedroom one-story dwellings on their newly purchased 3 acre Mission property overlooking the ocean, 20 miles from Liberia’s capital city, Monrovia.

Their first house, reserved for American missionary David DiCanio, who is overseeing the construction project, started within five months of the land purchase and finished by October the following year.

House number one sits on the oceanfront next to house number two with the added porch area.

House number two, with the added porch cover, sits on the oceanfront next to house number one.

Before house one was completed, work on house two commenced, but had to be halted shortly after laying the foundation because of an armed robbery on the compound, necessitating diversion of funds to significant and unanticipated security measures, including a security wall, guard tower, and security dog kennel.

Construction on house two recommenced in September, 2013, but was again halted in April, 2014, due to lack of funds. Shortly after, the Ebola virus hit West Africa, and the FPCNA Mission Board closed the compound and evacuated both missionaries.

a view of house two from the miniature hallway looking into the kitchen (left) and bedroom (right).

A view of house two from the miniature hallway looking into the kitchen (left) and bedroom (right).

When the missionaries returned 9 months later in May of 2015, construction on house two recommenced, even though funds were still limited.

“The primary goal is to bring house two to the point where I can move in,” Greer said. “When the remaining funds are raised, the rest of the house can be finished off and furnished so that visitors or teams could also stay in it.”

Right now, the missionaries are waiting for the carpenter to finish skirting (base boards), closet shelving, and ceiling trim, and plumbers to finish installing bath room sinks with cabinets, and toilets.

Front door of house number two.

Front door of house number two.

“The key is that the house is livable and secure, even though we don’t have all the finer details,” DiCanio said. “The window bars and security doors are all in place, and the outside security lighting has been finished.”

DiCanio said there are enough funds to purchase one air conditioner for the main bedroom, an important feature in an incredibly muggy climate, and some interior doors, leaving others for later.

“We also decided to install sixty-five $1 light sockets throughout the house,” DiCanio said. “It doesn’t look great, but it gives light until funds are available for proper fixtures.”

Our worker (Emmanuel) paints the ceiling trim in one of the four bedrooms where the temporary light sockets were recently installed.

Mission compound worker (Emmanuel) paints the ceiling trim in one of the four bedrooms where the temporary light sockets were recently installed.

Greer asks supporters to pray that the carpenter, plumber, and electrician would show up to work and finish the job. One challenge of doing the work piecemeal is that laborers had to move on to other jobs until the mission was ready for them to return. Since they had already made other commitments, it has been difficult for some of them to finish the job.